Friday, December 17, 2010

  • Canning Butter

    I always thought I knew about canning from growing up on my Father’s farm. As the story goes you’re never too old to learn. I have never canned meats or butter. Meats we always put up in another form.

    Recently & thankfully I met a couple of women through the Richmond Meet-up of Survivalism and this is just one thing that I would like to pass along that my new friend has shown me. Enjoy and be sure to leave your comments on how this worked for you.

    My intention it to start posting more information on preparing for hard times when the impending prices of foods and materials go up.

Now you can purchase canned butter from The Internet Grocer or make it yourself using the directions below.

1. Use any butter that is on sale. Lesser quality butter requires more shaking (see #5 below), but the results are the same as with the expensive brands.

2. Heat pint jars in a 250 degree oven for 20 minutes, without rings or seals. One pound of butter slightly more than fills one pint jar, so if you melt 11 pounds of butter, heat 12 pint jars. A roasting pan works well for holding the pint jars while in the oven.

3. While the jars are heating, melt butter slowly until it comes to a slow boil. Using a large spatula, stir the bottom of the pot often to keep the butter from scorching. Reduce heat
and simmer for 5 minutes at least: a good simmer time will lessen the amount of shaking required (see #5 below). Place the lids in a small pot and bring to a boil, leaving the lids in simmering water until needed.

4. Stirring the melted butter from the bottom to the top with a soup ladle or small pot with a handle, pour the melted butter carefully into heated jars through a canning jar funnel. Leave 3/4" of head space in the jar, which allows room for the shaking process.

5. Carefully wipe off the top of the jars, then get a hot lid from the simmering water, add the lid and ring and tighten securely. Lids will seal as they cool. Once a few lids "ping," shake while the jars are still warm, but cool enough to handle easily, because the butter will separate and become foamy on top and white on the bottom. In a few minutes, shake again, and repeat until the butter retains the same consistency throughout the jar.

6. At this point, while still slightly warm, put the jars into a refrigerator. While cooling and hardening, shake again, and the melted butter will then look like butter and become firm. This final shaking is very important! Check every 5 minutes and give the jars a little shake until they are hardened in the jar! Leave in the refrigerator for an hour.

7. Canned butter should store for 3 years or longer on a cool, dark shelf. [It does last a long time. We have just used up the last of the butter we canned in 1999, and it was fine after 5 years.] Canned butter does not "melt" again when opened, so it does not need to be refrigerated upon opening, provided it is used within a reasonable length of time.

A lovely glow seems to emanate from every jar. You will also be glowing with grateful satisfaction while placing this "sunshine in a jar" on your pantry shelves.

We have canned over 75 pints of butter in the past year. Miles loves it and will open a jar when I'm not looking! I buy butter on sale, then keep it frozen until I have enough for canning 2 or 3 batches of a dozen jars each.

Saturday, December 11, 2010

Linus Christmas Monologue

This is Such a Wonderful Christmas Explanation.

Then I had to ask myself when was the last time I had heard this explained
and I wonder how many children have had the chance to see this. Hope you'll
take a moment and share with yours!


It Is That Time Of Year Again I Wish To Remind Everyone Of, Another Small Way to Help: St. Jude's Ranch for Children

The children at the ranch use these cards to make "new" cards and other gifts for St. Jude's and a little money for themselves.

Instead of throwing them in the trash or the recycle bins, help the kids out by mailing just the FRONTS (makes shipping a lighter postage).

Because of ecards they're not receiving what they used to. They are accepting used, all-occaision cards from November 15, 2009 to February 28, 2010. Actually when I called this year I was told that I could mail them anytime.

This is my second year of doing this. Last year was a great success thanks to everyone who helped. One suggestion is to contact your Churches or other groups you may belong to and you will find they are more than will to participate!

St.Jude's Ranch for Children Recycled Card Program100 St. Jude's StreetBoulder, NV 89005

IF: we could find a way for ones to gather them from different places I could arrange to pick them up and mail them in a flat rate postage box. We could ask our churches, offices, organization or print this out and have your children to take it to their classes and then arrange for me to meet and pick them up and I’ll pay the shipping. If you should decide to ship them on your own ask the post office to weigh them. Wouldn't it be awesome to see how many pounds we actually shipped?